Aug 272014
 

What is a Resistor?

resistor is an electrical element that causes opposition to the flow  of the electric current

ResistorThis causes that a voltage appear on the terminals of the resistor. The diagram below shows an incandescent light bulb, located on the path of an electric current.

This current leaves the positive terminal of the battery and returns to the negative terminal, passing through the light bulb. This light bulb behaves like a resistor. Resistors are represented with the capital letter “R” and its values (resistance) are measured in Ohms. (Ω)

Light bulb behaves like a resistor

Resistors are manufactured in a wide variety of values. There are resistors with values of Kilo Ohms (KΩ), MegaOhms (MΩ). Larger resistors (external dimensions) are those that can dissipate more heat. The larger the resistor, the more heat it can dissipate. Kilo Ohms (KΩ) and MegOhms (MΩ) are used to represent very big resistances. On the following chart we see the equivalences among them.

  • 1 MicroOhm = 1 x 10-6 Ohms (Ω)
  • 1 Kilo Ohm (KΩ) = 1 x 103 Ohms
  • 1 MegaOhm (MΩ) = 1 x 106 Ohms
  • 1 MegaOhm (MΩ) = 1 x 103 KiloOhms (KΩ)

In order to know the value of a resistor without measuring it, there is a resistor color code that helps us to easily obtain its resistance. To obtain the resistance of any element of a specific material, it is necessary to know some details of the material such as: its length, cross area, specific resistance or resistivity of the material that is made.

Resistance and Conductance

The conductance measures the ability of a material to allow electrical current to pass. The reciprocal or inverse of the resistance is the conductance, and it is generally represented by the capital letter “G”. A circuit with high conductance has low resistance, and vice versa. G = 1/R

  • A resistance of 1 Ohm has a conductance of 1 mho
  • A resistance of 1000 Ohms have a conductance of 0.001 mho (“ohm” spelled backwards).
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