May 102019
 

What is an Inductor?

The capacitor storages energy in the form of electric field, however, inductor stores energy in form of magnetic field due to the self-induction phenomenon. A cable where a current circulates, has on its surroundings a magnetic field. The direction of flow of the   magnetic field is establishes by the Right hand Law.

Since the inductor is made of cable spires, the magnetic field circulates throughout the center of the coil and it runs all the wayout surrounding the spires and going back to the center.

Inductor? - Inductance - Units

The inductor is a passive electric component made of a conductive wire
wrapped into a spring like form.

One of the interesting features is its opposition to abrupt changes in the electric current flowing through them. This means that when we try to modify the current that circulates through them (for example: to be connected and disconnected to a power source of continuous current), it will try to maintain its previous condition.

This event occurs on an ongoing basis, when the inductor is connected to a source of alternating current and it causes a phase difference between the voltage applied to it and the current flowing through.

In other words: The inductor is an element that reacts against the changes of the electric current that flows through it creating a voltage on its terminals that opposes the applied voltage. This is proportional to the rate of change of the current.

Inductance – Units

The inductance measures the value of opposition of the inductor to the flow of the electric current and it is measured in henry (H). We may find values of milihenrys (mH). This value depends on the following:

  • The number of turns that the inductor has (the more turns, the bigger the inductance).
  • The diameter of the spires (turn). The more diameter, the bigger the inductance.
  • The length of the cable that the coil is made of.
  • The type of material that the nucleus is made of, if any.
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

 Leave a Reply

(required)

(required)