Current Divider in parallel resistors

Current Divider in parallel resistors

Current divider in parallel resistors The electric current passing through a circuit of two resistors in parallel is divided in two. Part of the current passes through the first resistor and the other part passes through the second one. The amount of current through a resistor depends on the value that the resistor has. In order to know what is the current passing […]

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Voltage divider

Voltage divider

Voltage divider When two or more resistors are connected in series, the current that flows through them is the same. The equivalent resistor is obtained adding all the resistors values, and we can find the current using the Ohm’s Law: I = V / Rs, where Rs = R1 + R2 + R3 See the chart below where we find the original and the equivalent circuit. […]

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Superposition Theorem

Superposition Theorem

The Superposition Theorem The Superposition theorem is used to find: The current values in a circuit with more than one voltage source. The voltage values at some point of a circuit that has more than one voltage source. The Superposition theorem states that the effect of two or more voltage sources in a resistor is equal to the sum of the individual […]

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Millman's Theorem

Millman’s Theorem

Millman’s Theorem The Millman’s equivalent circuit Many circuits have more than one voltage source, for example: Banks of batteries for emergency lighting, parallel power generators, etc.. Each of these sources of voltage has a different internal resistane. All these sources of voltage are connected to the same load. Look at the first picture (The original circuit diagram) The Millman’s Theorem shows us […]

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Norton's Theorem

Norton’s Theorem

Norton’s Theorem The Norton’s Theorem is similar to the Thevenin’s Theorem. It can be seen that, the equivalent circuit is: A Voltage source (Thevenin voltage: Vth) in series with a resistor (Thevenin resistance: RTH) Thevenin equivalent circuit This theorem says that the equivalent Norton circuit is a combination of a current source in parallel with a resistor. It is easy to find the Norton equivalent circuit when we […]

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Thevenin's theorem

Thevenin’s theorem

The Thevenin’s theorem The Thevenin’s theorem is used to convert a two terminal complex circuit, into a very simple circuit containing only one voltage source (Vth) in series with a single resistor (RTH). See pictures #1 and #5. Vth is called the Thevenin voltage Rth is called the Thevenin resistance and all together is called the Thevenin equivalent circuit The new circuit will […]

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Ohm's Law

Ohm’s Law

Ohm’s Law explanation Ohm’s Law can be easily understood if we analyze a circuit where there is a battery (12 volts source of voltage) in series with a 6 ohms resistor. You can establish a relation between the battery voltage, the resistor’s value and the electric current that passes through this resistor. This relation is: I = V/R and it […]

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